Gillette: Making Our Own Products Look Bad

FlexBallIt is called the ProGlide FlexBall and it is Gillette’s latest razor innovation. As always they have a huge marketing and advertising campaign to launch the new razor. They are even getting some praise for the business model they are using and how it such a departure from their norm. However after reading the article and seeing some of the commercials for Gillette’s new razor something bothered me and it is something that always bothers me when Gillette advertises a new product. They always rip on their own preexisting product to make the new one look better.

I understand that comparison ads are a regular strategy used by many companies, but typically these are done comparing Company A’s new product to Company B’s new product to make A’s look better. Gillette, however, likes to compare their new product to their old product and make their old product look bad. They did it with Sensor vs Mach 3, Mach 3 vs Fusion, Fusion vs ProGlide and as the video below shows, ProGlide vs ProGlide Flexball.

 

Gillette does make a great product, I should know I use the Fusion, but are they going to tell me that all other companies make such inferior products that they have to use their own products vs each other to get the point across? Gillette does have innovative products, even their older models stand up over time, so why bash these older products just to make sales with the new ones? As long as I have worked in marketing, I never thought about being negative towards one of my own products and I still don’t agree with this strategy. Gillette obviously doesn’t have a problem with it and I am sure when their next great innovation comes out The FlexBall will find itself on the other side of the comparison.

Author: Gary Balakoff

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Spontaneous Travel

There are a lot of companies doing spontaneous travel campaigns to promote their products. I like the concept of someone getting randomly picked and being whisked away on an immediate adventure. Wish that would happen to me. One problem, the commercials never seem legit, they always feel like it was staged. Here is one of the recent ads, Expedia- Find Your Spontaneity:

There is also an extended version HERE

When I watch these types of commercials, I feel like all the individuals are reading from a script, like they are hired actors, especially the people who end up going on the trip. For this Expedia one I picture the actor showing up for a shoot in the park, dressed like he just got out of work and reciting a few lines, then they film some clips of him packing. A few days or weeks later they do a location shoot in China on the Great Wall (who knows that may not even be real). Ok, I could believe a few of the people they talk to in the park are not actors, but I just don’t feel that the guy going on the trip is a random person.

Here are 3 recent online commercials I saw with spontaneous travel themes. What do you think, do these feel real or staged?

Doritos- The Boldest WWE Fan

 

Heineken- Departure Roulette

 

and Heineken- Departure Roulette En Route

 

The idea of spontaneous travel and giving a random person the experience of a life time at the drop of a hat is great and a memorable way to promote your product. I just wish the commercials felt more authentic and less staged. Even if they are not real, make me believe they are. I want to feel like there is a chance, even if a small one, that it could happen to me. (So you’re telling me there’s a chance.)

Author: Gary Balakoff

Top 3 AT&T It’s Not Complicated kids commercials

One of the better campaigns out right now is AT&T’s It’s Not Complicated kids campaign. They are some of my favorite commercials running at this time. I love the off-the-cuff feel and how the kids seem to drive the conversations. Yes, I have read articles talking about how the commercials are not completely adlib and that there is a basic scripted idea. However the articles also mentioned that the directors will let the kids talk and see where it goes, a film everything and see what there is in the end approach. Obviously the kids steal the show, but the actor (Beck Bennett) is just as funny and delivers the right amount of lines to enhance the comedic level without overshadowing the kid’s performances.

Since I enjoy this campaign so much I thought I would rank my top 3.

Honorable Mentions: Dizzy (here) and Nicky Flash (here)

These two crack me up, but just weren’t funny enough to make my top 3.  They were good enough that I had to at least mention them, so feel free to click the links and view them.

Number 3: More

The girl’s rambling about why someone would want more seems to go nowhere, but strangely enough I feel like I can follow her thinking.  This sediment is backed up by Beck’s nicely placed line “I follow you”.

 

Number 2: Werewolf

The little girl’s statement about becoming a werewolf is so random. She goes on and on about becoming a werewolf as an example for why it is better to be fast. The rambling in this spot actually does go nowhere, but is funny enough that I don’t really care. My favorite part being when she makes the growling noise and then translates it. Beck delivers a perfectly timed and confused sounding “what?” that wraps it up nicely.

 

and Number 1: Tree House

The disco comment is funny but the little boy’s delivery when he is talking about the T.V. is amazing and such a representation of how kids communicate (trust me I have a 3 year old boy of my own). That boy steals the show.  Not to mention that he is talking about putting a flat screen in a tree house, which is funny enough.  This commercial makes me laugh every time I see it, even when I looked up the clip for this post.

 

If you are interested, there is a short behind the scenes video on the making of these commercials HERE.

Author: Gary Balakoff

Truth or Just Gross- Too much shock in ads

shocked_woman

I have always been a fan of the Truth, anti-smoking campaigns.  For one, I agree with the message they are trying to send, but I also love the creativity and guerilla marketing style the commercials portray. About a week ago though, I saw their latest ad and I have mixed feelings. It got me thinking, when does advertising become too over-the-top and distract from your message.

Their commercial is called Ugly Truth: Poop vs Pee, take a look:

I get that the Truth campaign is about shock value, but I feel like this is a bit much.  When I saw it, I wasn’t shocked at the information they were giving me about smoking, I was shocked at the images I was seeing on the TV. Also, it took seeing the ad a few more times to really understand the message they were trying to pass along. Shocking or surprising content in a commercial is a valid tactic, but when does it become too much.  Is there a point, at which we can say, that is too much shock value, our ad is losing its effectiveness?

I don’t have that answer, but what I can say is that a commercial or any ad should leave the recipient thinking about the product or service you are trying to sell.  An ad should make someone want to go buy what you are selling or at least want to find out more about it. When a commercial gets to the point that it is all shock and no content I think it starts to be less effective. When people start to walk away thinking about how crazy a commercial or ad was instead of the message you were trying to give about your products or services, it may be time to start scaling back on the shock.

Author: Gary Balakoff

Taco Bell, Star Wars and Luke Skywalker

luke_xwing

As a huge fan of Star Wars and Taco Bell’s Dorito Loco Tacos, I would like to use Luke Skywalker blowing up the Death Star to highlight what I like about how Taco Bell handled the launch of the Cool Ranch version of the Loco Taco.

When Taco Bell launched the Doritos Loco Taco (can’t believe it took so long for someone to figure that amazing combination out) it was an instant success.  In fact it became the fastest selling Taco Bell item of all time (source). Personally, I think they are delicious and contributed to those sales figures. It wasn’t long after the release of the Nacho Cheese flavored taco that chatter for a Cool-Ranch flavored one started.  Talk of a Cool Ranch Loco Taco seemed to be everywhere, friends, co-workers, social media, radio and TV. I kept hearing people say, if Taco Bell was making a Nacho Cheese one, it only makes sense to have a Cool Ranch one. However, there was no announcement or release of a Cool Ranch taco and Taco Bell was sitting tight with just the nacho cheese one.

x-wings

This brings me to Star Wars, Episode IV: A New Hope (because we all know the original trilogy is all that matters, but that is a completely different post). The strategy Taco Bell chose to go with is much like the strategy Luke Skywalker employed to destroy the Death Star in the movie. At the end of the movie Luke is part a squadron of fighter pilots that must hit a specific target to destroy the evil empire’s massive starship, the Death Star. Luke is able to get himself within striking distance of the target and is moving in to take the shot. As he does so Darth Vader (the enemy) starts chasing him. Now Luke has a fairly clear shot, although from some distance, but chooses to get closer and closer to have a better shot, even with Darth Vader closing in on him. Despite the pressure of Darth Vader about to shoot him down, Luke stays his course and gets in position for the perfect shot… BOOM, destroying the Death Star and saving the day.

Taco Bell, much like Luke waited, even with all the pressure to release a Cool Ranch Loco Taco, for the best possible moment.  Think about it, the Nacho Cheese flavored taco was breaking sales records and a Cool Ranch flavored one would have just added to those sales, but that would have given Taco Bell only one wave of excitement, with the flavors running parallel.  Instead Taco Bell waited and waited, even with all the demand, till the right time when the hype was calming down for the Nacho Cheese flavor. Then, with a very strategic launch, started a brand new wave of excitement with the Cool Ranch flavor. This may not have been easy, but by taking the same approach as Luke Skywalker and waiting for that perfect shot, Taco Bell created two very successful product launches for each of the flavors, not just one combined launch with the flavors together. They even made light of it in their commercials for the Cool Ranch Loco Taco.

With your campaigns, do you have the nerve to go against popular opinion? Can you stick to the plan you think will get you the most success even with your customer base and/or critics saying you should do something else? Will the Force be with you like it was for Luke Skywalker and Taco Bell?

Author: Gary Balakoff

Not your average billboard

mcdonalds_chalk_billboard   orphea-billboard

I think billboards are such an underutilized and underappreciated medium. Too often people ignore their value or overlook the creative opportunities they can provide.  For lack of a better term, billboards have been type cast and many feel are only good for advertising your companies contact information.

This is why I think they offer an opportunity to stand out and get noticed and why I love seeing outside the box billboard concepts.  I recently came across two examples on AdFreak (here and here) that I think do a great job of standing out and go beyond the boring billboard stereotype.

1.      McDonalds Chalkboard Menu Billboard
Chalkboard menus can be creative in their own right, but taking that concept and putting it on a billboard scale is impressive. I like this concept for a few reasons. First, it’s creativeness, taking a chalk menu and putting it somewhere it doesn’t really belong. Who thinks to do hand drawn chalk boards at that size. Second, the commitment to the concept, they could have just done a drawing and when it faded, take it down or then draw a new one. No, they changed it out two times a day to keep it fresh and make a statement. This leads to my third point, it ties so nicely into their new fresh menu items. When I think of chalkboard menus it makes me think of small local sandwich shops. Also using chalk gives it a real rustic and homemade feel, not some mass produced piece, which is what McDonalds seems to be going for with its new items.

 

2.      Orphea Bug Spray
I like this one because it takes a billboard and makes it what I am going to call indirectly interactive (a mouthful I know). As an observer there is an interactive quality to it.  I understand that an individual cannot directly do anything with the billboard, but the real life changes that take place because of the bugs sticking can be immediately observed.  As a passerby you can clearly see the changes taking place and have an immediate reaction to those changes.  Another thing that I really like about this billboard is how clearly it demonstrates the purpose of the product.  The bug spray claims to kill bugs and its billboard illustrates the bug spray killing bugs.

The next time you are running a campaign; don’t underestimate using a billboard for your advertising. If you can come up with an outside the box idea like one of these, it just might help you stand out.

Author: Gary Balakoff